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MSI Introduces Low-Sensory Mornings

2/28/2018, noon | Updated on 2/28/2018, noon

MSI Introduces Low-Sensory Mornings

By: Katherine Newman

The Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) recently began offering Low-Sensory Mornings. This new experience adjusts exhibits in the museum to make them more enjoyable for visitors who have sensory needs.

The museum acknowledged on its website that there would still be some competing sights and sounds within the exhibits, but they did what they could to quiet down

for the Low-Sensory Morning.

“This program invites guests with sensory needs, including those with autism and who prefer a quieter experience, to explore MSI at their own pace. We’ve been hearing feedback from our guests who are interested in exploring the Museum in this capacity, and we are very excited to be able to offer a new way to discover all the Museum has to offer,” said Katie Schweiger, manager of specialized experiences at MSI.

The Low-Sensory Mornings have two components, according to Schweiger. “Pre-registered guests can explore the Idea Factory, a hands-on exhibit with a really fun water feature, as well as our Farm Tech exhibit before the Museum opens to the public from 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. There is no age limit to register,” said Schweiger. “When MSI opens to the public at 9:30 a.m., guests will notice that some interactive elements have been turned off, including our 1.5-million volt Tesla coil inside Science Storms and the Coal Mine whistle.

Videos, sounds, and music inside other exhibit spaces will also have their volume turned down.”

The museum is also offering the free rental of noise-canceling headphones for visitors who do better with very limited sounds. Everything gets turned on and the museum is back to normal at noon, according to Schweiger.

This was an important experience to add to the current programming and events at MSI of their mission to inspire everyone.

“Our mission and the Museum of Science and Industry is to inspire the inventive genius in everyone, and our Low-Sensory Mornings provide guests even more opportunities to feel that spark of creativity by exploring topics in science, technology, engineering, and medicine,” said Schweiger.

Staff will be on hand at all Low-Sensory Mornings to assist with any special requests and provide assistance.

MSI Facilitators receive regular training on addressing the needs of guests so the skills that they already have will be incorporated into the flow of the morning, according to

Schweiger.

For more information on Low-Sensory Mornings and to sign up for alerts on future mornings visit msichicago.