Quantcast

CHICAGO BRIDGE GETS A MAKEOVER

4/5/2017, noon | Updated on 4/5/2017, noon
“The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) announced that $4.2 million dollars will be released for a City of Chicago project ...
A photo of the Lawrence side of the bridge scheduled to be repaired. The Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT) said scheduled repairs at Lake Shore Drive over Lawrence and Wilson Avenue bridges will begin this 2017 summer and will last between six to eight months. The $8.4 million cost will be split between state and federal funding. Photo by Chris Shuttlesworth

Chicago Bridge Gets A Makeover

“The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) announced that $4.2 million dollars will be released for a City of Chicago project to repair two key [impaired] bridges that carry Lake Shore Drive over Lawrence Avenue and Wilson Avenue. The project’s total cost will estimate to $8.4 million combined, which will be split between state and federal funding,” according to an IDOT press release.

IDOT’s Public Information Officer Gianna Urgo and the Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT) Director of Public Affairs, Michael Claffey stated that safety is their main goal and believe the bridges are in need of significant repairs.

“Safety is our top priority and these two bridges are badly in need of rehabilitation,” Claffey said. “The [bridges] were recently cited in a report by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association as being among the top ten most-traveled structurally deficient bridges in Illinois.”

Claffey highlighted that although the Lawrence and Wilson Avenue bridges were listed as “structurally deficient,” it doesn’t mean they present a danger to the public.

It only means that they need to be closely monitored and require rehab work in the near future. According to IDOT, the project’s repairs will improve the safety and “extend the life of the bridges.”

Scheduled Repairs at Lake Shore Drive over Lawrence and Wilson Avenue will begin during this 2017 summer and will last between six to eight months, Claffey said.

“Structural repairs will address the heavily deteriorated concrete beams and installation of protective shielding under the badly deteriorated concrete deck,” he said. Wynndalco Enterprises, which is an “certified MBE/DBE that provides Design Engineering, Information Technology, and E-Rate Program consultant services,” provided their services to CDOT on the Lawrence and Wilson Avenue bridge’s project, according to wynndalco.com.

“Phase I scope of work included the preparation of a Phase I Report/ Environmental Assessment (ECAD) and the following reports: Location Design Study, Bridge Condition Report, and Geotechnical Report. These reports addressed design criteria, traffic analysis, typical section analysis, type, size and location plans, right-of-way determination, horizontal/ vertical alignment alternatives, topographic survey, soil conditions, intersection design studies, environmental inventory and mitigation and bridge alternative studies.

Phase II design services included the preparation of plans, specifications and cost estimates for the replacement of both bridges,” according to wynndalco.com. Illinois Transportation Secretary Randy Blankenhorn said once the community bridges are repaired they will provide better passages for residents and commuters across the city of Chicago.

“The Lawrence and Wilson bridges provide a vital connection between communities and the lakefront,” Blankenhorn said. “These repairs will deliver safer travel along and under the bridges, allowing residents to better enjoy Chicago’s beautiful lakefront as they walk, bike or drive to the beach,” according to an IDOT press release.