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AUNT MARTHA’S OPENS NEW PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN ROSELAND

11/22/2016, midnight | Updated on 11/22/2016, midnight
Residents in the Roseland community can now go to a brand new primary health care center, instead of making unnecessary ...
Yvonne Carter (standing), a patient at the New Roseland Community Hospital's Primary Health Care Center signs in, while Patricia Ramierz (seated), a Medical Office Assistant for the health care center assists carter with an appointment. An Illinois Department of Public Health report shows that Emergency Department visits in the Roseland Community were 50 percent higher in comparison to the overall statewide rate. Aunt Martha's and the New Roseland Community Hospital donated funds to open the clinic.

AUNT MARTHA’S OPENS NEW PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN ROSELAND

By Safiyyah P. Muhammad

Residents in the Roseland community can now go to a brand new primary health care center, instead of making unnecessary emergency room visits, thanks to partners such as Aunt Martha and the New Roseland Community Hospital. The clinic recently opened at the New Roseland Community Hospital, at 45 W. 111th

Street on hospital 3rd floor.pregnancy.”

It is a common occurrence that patients sometime cannot clearly determine whether they are experiencing a true medical emergency and rush themselves Emergency Department (ED)

to find out that their visit was not life threatening. Tom Owens, vice-president, Communications & Development for Aunt Martha’s said, “When we’re faced with an illness or an injury, there’s often a sense of uncertainty about what to do or where to go for care, especially if the symptoms seem severe or our doctor’s office is closed.

Because every person and every situation are unique, it’s difficult to create a hard and fast list of symptoms or conditions that should or should not be addressed in an emergency department. If you have a medical home, you can never go wrong by making that your first stop; but, when in doubt, trust

your gut. If you believe it’s serious, please do not hesitate. Go to the nearest emergency room or pick up the phone and call 911.”

Pennington points

out that an Illinois Department of Public Health report shows

that Emergency Department visits in the Roseland Community were 50 percent higher in comparison to the overall

statewide rate.

Owens said, “There is no single factor that can be pointed to the reason for the volume of unnecessary ED visits in the Roseland community. It’s likely a combination of access and awareness.

We’re doing what we can to increase access, the availability of services. With our move into the New Roseland Community Hospital, we’re able to expand the services we offer to include primary care, women’s health, family planning and pediatrics, which we’ll have on-site in early 2017. Of course, people

will only come to our health center if they know it’s there. That’s one of the reasons our partnership with the hospital is so important, and it’s why our community health care workers and outreach staff will be going out to talk about our services and build partnerships with the schools, churches and other organizations that are the backbone of the community.”

Owens offered an explanation

and shared the difference between what is called primary care and the emergency care. He said, your medical home, or your primary care provider helps you manage your overall health. This is where you go for common illnesses, minor injuries and things like immunizations or physical exams. The biggest difference between a medical home and the emergency department is that the care team at your medical home

knows you and they know your medical history. That means they have all of the information necessary to help you make the best decisions about your care. Emergency care is for serious

medical conditions that are life-threatening, like a heart attack,

stroke, serious head injuries, potential fractures, or injuries sustained motor vehicle accidents.

Pennington stated that in the clinic’s first year of operation,

they expect to serve about 2,700 primary care and women’s health (OB) patients, including patients with chronic illnesses like diabetes and asthma. Pennington also added that Aunt Martha’s has been providing health care services to the Roseland

community since 2012.

“We’ve got to teach people how to work with the health care system, to reframe the way they think about

health care. Over time, as more and more patients are connected to a medical home – at Aunt Martha’s or elsewhere – there will be a decline in unnecessary ED visits. That

decline will come as a result of patients understanding how to

work with the primary care team at their medical home,” Owens

said.

Owens added that Aunt Martha’s operates eight (8) other

health centers in Cook County and a total of 19 clinics in eight (8) counties across Illinois.