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Wright Around Chicago Features Robie House in Hyde Park

7/12/2016, midnight | Updated on 7/12/2016, midnight
It’s summer time in Chicago, the season of fun, food and festivals is upon us. For visiting tourists and for ...
Pictured is the Frederick C. Robie House, a U.S. National Historic Landmark on the campus of the University of Chicago in the neighborhood of Hyde Park in Chicago, Illinois. The house is located on 5757 S. Woodlawn Avenue on the South Side. It was designed and built between 1908 and 1910 by architect Frank Lloyd Wright and is renowned as the greatest example of the Prairie School style, the first architectural style that was uniquely American. It was designated a National Historic Landmark on November 27, 1963 and was on the very first National Register of Historic Places list of October 15, 1966. The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust conducts ongoing historic preservation and operates public tours, programs and events at major Wright sites in five Chicago area locations including the Frederick C. Robie House in Hyde Park. Photo by Dan Smith

Wright Around Chicago Features Robie House in Hyde Park

By Monique Smith

It’s summer time in Chicago, the season of fun, food and festivals is upon us. For visiting tourists and for those that live in Chicago, summer time means there are loads of opportunities for citizens to explore the city by bike, bus or foot.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust wants Chicagoans to tour some of Wright’s famous structures in the city and surrounding suburbs. Wright Around Chicago is a guided bus tour that features the best of Wright designed structures in the city. The Pedal Oak Park is the guided bike tour that stops by 21 Wright designed structures in the Historic District of Oak Park.

Guests who choose to take the pedal tour are allowed to bring their own bikes but if not, one will be provided for them at no additional cost. Famed American architect, designer and educator Frank Lloyd

Wright made his mark on Chicago by designing some of the most unforgettable properties in the city. Wright was born is Wisconsin, but lived and worked in Chicago for the first 20 years of his career. He designed many homes in various Chicago and suburban neighborhoods. Wright’s personal residence in Oak Park is a part of the Pedal Oak Park tour. The Trust conducts ongoing historic preservation and operates public tours, programs and events at major Wright sites in five Chicago area locations. Locations include:

Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio (1889/1898), 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, IL 60302 The Rookery Light Court (1905-07),

209 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, IL 60604 Unity Temple (1905-08), 875 Lake Street, Oak Park, IL 60301 Frederick C. Robie House (1908-10) 5757 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 and; The Emil Bach House (1915), 7415 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust is a Chicagobased not-for-profit organization that provides public tour and educational programs at major Wright-designed structures. The Trust was established in 1974 as the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. In February 1997, the Home and Studio Foundation, by invitation of University of Chicago agreed to assume sole responsibility for the management, operation and restoration of Wright's Robie House, located on the University of Chicago campus.

In 2000, the Home and Studio Foundation changed its name to the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust to reflect the dual stewardship of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio and Wright’s Robie House. The organization wants to engage, educate and inspire the public through the interpretation of Wright’s design legacy.

In addition to tours, the Trust organization promotes Wright’s legacy through educational programming. They educate K-12 students through innovative design programs that nurture individual vision. They present quality adult enrichment programs, national/ international travel programs and produce electronic/ print publications.

Wright credits his mother who was an educator and introduced him to design and architecture via a set of building blocks she purchased for him as a child. In his lifetime Wright designed over 1,000 structures and 532 were completed. For more information on the tours or the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust organization visit, www.flwright.org.