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CSU Student Receives Future Teachers Scholarship Award

Deborah Bayliss | 2/26/2014, 4:12 p.m.
Angela Moore, 39, a disabled, single mother of two children, one of which is a special needs child, refused to allow the challenges of her personal life, stand in the way of a new career path as she pursue a teaching degree at Chicago State University.

Angela Moore, 39, a disabled, single mother of two children, one of which is a special needs child, refused to allow the challenges of her personal life, to stand in the way of a new career path as she pursues a teaching degree at Chicago State University. Moore is now the recipient of The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) 2013 Barbara Lotze Scholarship for Future Teachers award.

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Chicago State's Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering Studies offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Chemistry and Physics, as well as courses in physical science and a foundational program for further study in engineering. Students also have an opportunity to take part in a chemistry club a physics club and are starting a student chapter of the National Science Teachers Association.

“I applied for it but was surprised to get it,” Moore said of the $2000 Barbara Lotze scholarship award. “I’m proud to be one of five students nationwide, who received it. I’ve been out of the workforce for 11 years and live on my social security benefits and have exhausted all of the financial aid I could get. I’m now relying on scholarships and out-of-pocket money to pay my tuition which is what this money will go towards.”

A professional membership association of scientists dedicated to enhancing the understanding and appreciation of physics through teaching, AAPT was established in 1930 as a way of ensuring "dissemination of the knowledge of physics, particularly by way of teaching."

Founders, Homer L. Dodge, Paul E. Klopsteg, and William S. Webb, led the effort to organize the first association dedicated to improving physics education.

“I think Angela is going to make a major impact in her community on the south side of Chicago and will be a role model to many students underrepresented in the sciences,” said Dr. Mel Sabella, Professor of Physics and Chair of the Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering Studies at Chicago State University. “In addition, Angela can offer motivation and guidance to students who encounter extreme obstacles, like she has, which unfortunately are quite common in the communities where she will most likely be employed.”

Moore confides in Dr. Sabella who stated that he is constantly amazed at what Moore has accomplished.

“I am amazed by her perseverance,”Sabella stated. “She never gives up and is now quite close to finishing her degree and obtaining her certification.”

Moore said her professors at Chicago State have been extremely supportive.

A member of Chicago State’s Class of 2014 and described as a non-traditional student, Moore adds PhysTec Fellow, Robert Noyce Intern and Scholar, work as a teacher and teacher’s assistant for Chicago State University's CATs (Cougar Academy for Teachers), a summer enrichment program for junior high school students, to her resume.

Chicago State’s Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering Studies offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Chemistry and Physics, as well as courses in physical science and a foundational program for further study in engineering. Students also have an opportunity to take part in a chemistry club a physics club and are starting a student chapter of the National Science Teachers Association.